New ‘Droughty’ Soils Model Can Enhance Forest Health Efforts, Landscape Restoration

New ‘Droughty’ Soils Model Can Enhance Forest Health Efforts, Landscape Restoration

News Type: Regional Source: The Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife News Bulletin
Click here to read the article: http://www.cbbulletin.com/441370.aspx

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

The study, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112718300616?via%3Dihub

published in the journal Forest Ecology and Management, presents a “droughty” soil index model that can aid land management activities that enhance forest health and productivity, said study lead author Chris Ringo, a senior faculty research assistant at Oregon State University.

“There are widely different abilities of different soil types to absorb, store, and supply moisture to vegetation throughout the year,” Ringo said. “We demonstrated that the combination of climatic information and information on physical soil characteristics does a better job of identifying soils that experience prolonged periods of low summer moisture levels than either set of information does by itself.”